2023 Best 20 Omega Dress Watches

Best 20 Omega Dress Watches for 2023

When you think about Omega, you think of the Speedmaster; went to the moon. Seamaster; went to the bottom of the ocean. MoonSwatch; went to the Gala Awards evening on the wrist of James Bond. 

Unfortunately, the rich history of Omega’s dress watches and their contemporary offers drowns in a sea of sports models (pun intended). However, upon a closer look, you’ll realize that Omega has some of the best dress options you can actually get your hands on.

About Omega Dress Watches

As mentioned, Omega is famous for its sports models; in fact, Jack Forster even mentioned on a “Hey Hodinkee” video that most people forget about their dress options simply because their sports models are such good value. 

This is actually a pity seeing as how Omega has some brilliant options for those who prefer a bit of opulence rather than added water resistance. The Constellation line has been a mainstay for years, and the original pie-pan Constellation is on everyone’s list of must-haves. The Globemaster presents itself rather subtly and still remains one of the best luxury-orientated daily watches on the market. 

The De-Ville line hardly needs an introduction. With sophisticated style and more variety than you could ever need, this line certainly has the valor to stand up against the other giants in the Omega display case. The Seamaster is one of the best entry-level luxury divers, and the Speedmaster, well, they don’t call it Speedy Tuesday for nothing.

History of Omega Dress Watches

Omega set up shop originally in 1848 under the name La Generale Watch Co., founded by Louis Brandt, and officially switched to Omega SA in 1984. The first wristwatches bearing the Omega name were produced in 1900 and were used by English army officers. 

It is not entirely clear what the first Omega dress watch was, seeing as the description of a dress watch has changed throughout the years. Perhaps the first minute-repeater wristwatch released in September 1892 by Louis Brandt & Frère (precursor to Omega) was the first. 

The Constellation line is still in production today, and while it has gained sporty elements to keep up with the modern taste, it was anything but sporty upon its release in the early 1950s. Perhaps the De Ville line is what you would describe as their first dress watch, which was released in 1967. 

The Best Omega Dress Watches

  1. Omega Constellation Globemaster 39mm White Dial (Ref. 130.30.39.21.02.001)

The Globemaster line is perhaps the most underrated line within the Omega brand. Beneath a sea of Seamasters and Speedmasters, you have, in essence, the perfect everyday watch for those that prefer a bit more luxury than what the Aqua Terra offers. 

Sporting a 39mm diameter matched with an interesting fluted bezel constructed of tungsten for added durability without sacrificing the beautiful lines created by the highly polished case. The case sits on a beautifully finished three-link bracelet but can be dressed up with a leather strap as well. 

The model line also features various configurations, some with more luxurious undertones like the ones finished with rose or yellow gold or the blue-dialed versions. This particular reference presents itself with the white pie pan dial similar to the 1952 Constellation model. 

The movement within highly reliable Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 8900 equipped with a 60-hour power reserve and resistance to magnetic fields of 15,000 gauss.

2. Omega De Ville Prestige 39mm (Ref. 424.13.40.20.02.006)

Since its launch in 1976, the De Ville line has been a mainstay in the Omega catalog as a ‘dressier’ offshoot of the Seamaster but has since become a standalone series. The classy and elegant design is reflected in the small-by-today’s-standards 39.5mm case and is presented on a ‘hunter green’ leather strap. 

Several formal attributes are found on the dial, like the blackened hands, the black Roman numeral hour markers, and the six blackened cabochons. The silvery white dial features a silk-like pattern with an opaline finish and a subtle date aperture at 3 o’clock. 

3. Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 38mm Black Dial (Ref. 220.13.38.20.01.001)

The contemporary Aqua Terra line is reminiscent of the original 1948 Seamaster and is perhaps the most versatile Omega in the current lineup. The model presented here is no longer in production, but you’ll easily get this timepiece on the second-hand market. 

Sticking to the maritime theme, the dial features a black horizontal “teak” pattern similar to what you might find on a yacht. The dial remains extremely legible thanks to rhodium-plated hands and indexes, all filled with Super-LumiNova. A tenuous date function is located at the 6 o’clock position to increase the utility of this luxury-orientated everyday watch. 

Within the highly polished case is the Master Chronometer caliber 8800, certified by METAS and equipped with a 55-hour power reserve.

4. Omega Constellation Globemaster Annual Calendar 41mm (Ref. 130.53.41.22.03.001)

If you’re looking for an interesting spin on the annual calendar complication, perhaps the Constellation Globemaster Annual Calendar might be the watch for you. Presented with a classic size of 41mm and rose gold (or Sedna™ gold) construction mounted on a blue leather strap that matches the blue dial. 

The dial is perhaps the most special part of this watch. Between each of the pie pan facets, you’ll find the different months of the year written in cursive gold. The hands and the applied hour markers are also finished in gold. 

Flipping the case reveals even more gold presented with the rotor featuring Geneva waves in arabesque. The movement in question is the Master Chronometer caliber 8923, equipped with a 55-hour power reserve.

5. Omega De Ville Prestige Power Reserve 41mm (Ref. 434.53.41.21.10.001)

Matching dark green with gold has become tremendously popular in recent years, and Omega capitalized on this with a De Ville Prestige sporting this exact color scheme. The dark green dial features a stunning sun-brushed finished green dial that contrasts greatly against the golden Roman numerals and cabochon indexes. 

Two subregisters are located at the 6 and 9 o’clock positions displaying the power reserve and small seconds, respectively, improving the utility of this dress piece – something to chat about at dinner. The 41mm golden case is a classic design with a highly-polished bezel and lugs. 

Flipping the case reveals the sapphire caseback displaying the Master Co-Axial caliber 8810. The Co-Axial feature not only improves accuracy but also extends how long the watch can run before a service is needed. 

This particular self-winding movement is approved by METAS and is resistant to magnetic fields of up to 15,000 gauss in case you go wandering around any heavy machinery with your dress piece.

6. Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 41mm Brown Dial (Ref. 220.53.41.21.13.001)

If the combination of gold and deep green isn’t what you like, then perhaps a more subtle brown would suit you. This Aqua Terra is decked out with Sedna™ gold (or rose gold) and a deep brown dial that complements each other beautifully. 

Like other Aqua Terras, the movement powering this dressy Aqua Terra is the Master Chronometer caliber 8901, certified by METAS and equipped with a 60-hour power reserve. But the movement is not where this timepiece shines but rather shines on the dial. 

The sun-brushed brown dial combined with the horizontal “teak” pattern creates a beautiful contrast against the golden hands and applied hour markers. The mahogany theme continues with a brown strap and Sedna™ gold foldover clasp to create an integrated and upper-class look.  

7. Omega Constellation Master Chronometer 39mm Grey Dial (Ref. 131.13.39.20.06.002)

The Constellation namesake has been in production since the 50s but has only recently become its own line. While some might not like the contemporary Manhattan design, it is still one of the most opulent options produced by Omega. 

This 39mm steel ref. 131.13.39.20.06.002 features typical markers of the Constellation line, the fixed steel bezel with Roman numeral markers, and the “claws” on the side of the case. The sapphire caseback displays the expertly finished Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 8800 equipped with a Rhodium plated finish with Geneva waves in arabesque.

Yet again, it’s the dial where this timepiece shines. A horizontally-brushed ruthenium-grey dial is matched with blued numeral indexes, hands, and Omega scripture.

8. Omega De Ville Tresor 40mm Silver Dial (Ref. 435.13.40.21.02.001)

While the Tresor line was originally reserved for smaller sizes and for women in particular, the modern versions are offered in larger options and even worn by men since all watches are actually unisex. 

Unlike many of the options that feature a quartz movement, the reference presented here features a Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 8910, a hand-winding movement with expertly finished elements visible through the sapphire caseback.  

The case is perfectly sized for a contemporary dress piece, 40mm in diameter and 10.1mm thick. Moving from the highly polished case inwards to the domed opaline silver dial that displays nothing more but the 18K white gold hour indexes and a subtle date aperture at the 6 o’clock position.

9. Omega Seamaster Olympic Official Timekeeper (Ref. 22.53.40.20.04.002)

Omega has a rich history with the Olympics; in fact, Omega has been the official timekeeper of the Olympics for the past 28 Olympiads since 1932. They have also been known to produce limited-edition Olympic-themed watches such as this Olympic Official Timekeeper. 

This particular reference is a throwback to the vintage dress pieces produced by the brand in the 20s and sports various vintage-inspired attributes. A no-date eggshell white enamel dial embellished with a pop of color thanks to the red vintage Omega logo located at the 12 o’clock position matched with period-appropriate white gold leaf hands. 

The timepiece also sports a 39.5mm case constructed from Canopus Gold™, which is an alloy of 18k white gold with platinum, rhodium, and palladium. This material has been used by Omega since 2015 and is known for both its optic appeal and resistance to scratching. 

A taught lug-to-lug measurement of 44.5mm means the watch will fit most wrists perfectly and, with a thickness of merely 12mm, will slide under any dress cuff. 

10. Omega Constellation Master Chronometer 36mm White Dial (Ref. 131.10.36.20.02.001)

While many of us would love to wear a vintage Constellation on the wrist, they can be hard to find and maintain. The contemporary version lives up to the namesake by being just as visually appealing while holding true to the standards of Omega’s technological prowess. 

The Master Chronometer 36mm comes in many iterations, and this silver-dialed steel version presents itself as a subdued and subtle luxury dress piece. With classic sizing of 36mm in diameter and a 39.2mm lug-to-lug, the watch would not look out of place at a black tie event. 

The steel-on-steel aesthetic of the fixed steel bezel and steel case is a design synonymous with the Manhattan Constellation introduced in 1982. A sun-brushed silvery dial is matched with 18K white gold indexes for added opulence behind, which beats the Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 8800, a highly reliable self-winding movement with a 55-hour power reserve.

11. Omega De Ville Prestige Small Seconds 41mm (Ref. 434.13.41.20.10.001)

The De Ville Prestige line has been adorning the wrists of Omega enthusiasts since 1994 and finds itself in its third generation, still upholding its values of elegance combined with unusual optical aesthetics. While the 41mm polished case of this model might seem regular, the dial is anything but. 

The dial color can only be described as pine green and features a random vertical pattern in a sun-brushed finish – potentially making each dial individual. Golden-applied indexes and hands contrast beautifully against this color. The thin Roman numerals and cabochon indexes create a minimalist quality synonymous with dress pieces. 

Behind the intriguing dial sits the Master Co-Axial caliber 8802, which is also visible through the sapphire caseback. A self-winding movement with a decent 55-hour power reserve displaying time, small seconds, and a date at the 3 o’clock position. 

12. Omega Seamaster 300 (Ref. 233.20.41.21.01.001)

The Seamaster namesake hardly needs an introduction. Originally introduced in 1948, and has been in the catalog in one way or another ever since. While the Seamaster 300 Professional covers the sporty and diving section, the contemporary Seamaster 300 would appear to be a bit more grown-up. 

The model referenced here is finished in steel and 18K Sedna™ gold (rose gold) and features a ceramic bezel insert. The sand-blasted black dial has a brilliant contrast against the golden hands and patina-colored indexes, creating a dichotomy between sportiness and luxury. 

With the Master Co-Axial caliber 8400, the watch also presents itself as a rather usable traveling watch. With no date function to worry about, you’ll be able to set time easily and worry-free. There is a blue-dialed version of this reference as well but that veers more towards sportiness rather than dressiness.

13. Omega Speedmaster 38 (Ref. 324.32.38.50.02.001)

The Speedmaster is perhaps the only watch that all enthusiasts unanimously all respect. Whether it be a 321 version or even the Snoopy, there’s a Speedy out there for you. But what if you find yourself in the company of affluent folk? Which Speedmaster would you wear then? Well, the ref. 324.32.38.50.02.001, of course (I don’t expect anyone to remember the reference number of any of these pieces but it’s simply called the Speedmaster 38 okay). 

As the name suggests, this is a 38mm Speedy sporting interesting attributes compared to the mainstream brothers. First, it’s worn on a light leather strap making for a more dressy aesthetic. Elongated gold indexes on the dial match the minimalist approach when combined with the smaller seconds track on the outer rim of the dial. 

The bezel is finished in aluminum and doesn’t seem to have the same visual noise as the bezels found on other Speedmasters. Interestingly enough, this reference also has a 100m water resistance rating, double that of a normal Speedmaster, which is excellent if your formal occasion happens to have a pool and you feel inclined to take a dive.

14. Omega De Ville Tresor Small Seconds 40mm (Ref. 435.13.40.21.03.002)

Moving back to purely dress-oriented pieces with the De Ville Trésor. The Trésor line has been in production since 1949, and this contemporary version is a no-nonsense dress piece that, if it were alive, would scoff at the word “sporty”. 

Embodying elegance in a simple 40mm stainless steel case featuring highly polished edges and lugs matched with a domed deep blue dial. The long and slender 18K white gold hands are complimented with elongated white gold hour markers to create a rather slender look, matching the slender case thickness of 10.1mm. 

Thanks to the Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 8926 within, the timepiece tells hours and minutes with the addition of a small seconds sub registrar located at the 6 o’clock position. This METAS-certified movement has a rather robust 72-hour power reserve and features a manual-winding mechanism allowing for the entire case to be thinner due to the lack of a self-winding rotor.

15. Omega Seamaster 1948 (Ref. 511.93.38.20.99.002)

With a Speedmaster for every Tuesday of the month, you could opt for a Seamaster for every other day. If you like your Seamaster with a tad of grandeur, perhaps the Seamaster 1948 could be the one for you – released to celebrate the very first Seamaster models of 1948 with vintage styling and modern technology. 

Platinum was used to construct the 38mm polished case, a material we rarely see used in the horology world. In fact, the domed opaline dial is also finished in platinum and features rose gold hour markers, dauphine hands, and a vintage Omega logo. 

The distinctive design continues when you flip the case, revealing the METAS-certified Master Chronometer caliber 8807 behind the sapphire caseback. The sapphire crystal is laser-engraved and lacquered (by hand) with a Chris-Craft boat and a Gloster Meteor aircraft. These vessels were used in WWII, and the aviators wore, you guessed it, Omega.

16. Omega Constellation Master Chronometer 41mm Black Dial (Ref. 131.33.41.21.01.001)

The Manhattan Constellation might not be for everyone, but this black option might persuade you otherwise. Sized for contemporary tastes at 41mm and features a blend of a steel case, a polished black ceramic bezel, and something called Liquidmetal™. This is a blend of titanium, zirconium, and copper, which Omega bonds with ceramic to allow for increased hardness which allows them to use different finishing methods. 

The unembellished sun-brushed black dial is subtly decorated with the use of rhodium-plated hour markers, hands, and the Omega logo. Timekeeping duties are dealt with by the Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 8900. METAS-approved and equipped with a 60-hour power reserve.

17. Omega Seamaster Boutique Edition (Ref. 511.13.40.20.11.002)

Boutique and limited editions are something you either love or hate, but we cannot deny just how special these pieces sometimes are. Omega Boutiques had the opportunity to sell this Seamaster featuring visual appeal like nothing else in the product line. 

A 39.5mm polished case with a gorgeous burgundy lacquered domed dial displaying a gradient color change from a lighter center to a deeper outer dial. 18K white gold hour markers and hands make the dress-orientated piece highly legible with a subtle date aperture located at the 6 o’clock position.  

The caseback displays more of Omega’s craftsmanship, with several different engravings paying tribute to the brand’s iconography and achievements over the centuries. The same pattern can be found on the inside of the special World of Omega watch box.

18. Omega De Ville Tresor 41mm Grey Dial (Ref. 435.53.40.21.06.001)

From one minimalist piece to the next, here we have a De Ville Trésor sporting an 18K rose gold case measuring 40mm in diameter and with a 44.8mm lug-to-lug the watch wears comfortably on most wrists. A snug 10.8mm thickness means it’ll slide under most cuffs, but you wouldn’t want to hide this piece. 

The domed grey enamel dial is subtle yet beautiful to behold and juxtaposes elegantly with the elongated rose gold hour indexes and thin hands. The dial finish is thanks to the Grand Feu technique, or the art of fusing glass to metal which is incredibly hard to execute.  

Matched with a grey leather strap and the Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 8929, the watch not only shines in beauty but in technological prowess as well – a manual-winding movement, METAS-certified, and with a robust 72-hour power reserve.

19. Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra GMT Worldtimer Sedna Gold (Ref. 220.50.43.22.02.001)

The world timer complication was officially featured on a wristwatch for the first time in 1931, thanks to the innovation of Louis Cottier, a brilliant Swiss watchmaker. Omega’s contemporary version finds itself in the everyday option of their catalog – the Aqua Terra. 

To add to the dressy aesthetic of this piece, the case and three-link bracelet are fully constructed from 18K yellow gold or Sedna™ gold. The hour markers and hands are also finished in gold and are filled with lume. 

While the case is something special, the dial is where the noteworthy craftsmanship of Omega begins to show. They took an unusual spin on the world timer complication using texture, color, and finishing techniques to make a busy dial appear a lot more visually appealing. 

In the center, you’ll find a grade 5 titanium plate that has been laser-engraved to display a realistic globe as well as the watch’s namesake at noon. Chemical processing on said globe allows Omega to display topography and different biomes without the use of paint. 

Surrounding this titanium plate is a 24-hour display behind a Hesalite crystal, split to display day and night time hours. As with other world timers, you’ll find the names of cities towards the outer edge of the dial, some between the faceted hour makers and some on the rehaut (or flange). 

It would be hard to find another world timer that features such attention to detail at the price point, and while many would prefer a normal Seamaster or a Speedmaster, those that know will know just how special this piece is. And those who don’t know might just appreciate the globe on your watch because it looks quite cool. 

20. Omega De Ville Tourbillon (Ref. 529.53.43.22.01.001)

 

While the Tourbillon might not be essential in the world we live in today, it was essential not so long ago. The first Tourbillon wristwatch caliber was actually created by Omega in 1947, but the first Tourbillon was created by legendary watchmaker Abraham Louis Breguet in 1801. Originally created to be used in pocket watches to massively improve accuracy, they are slightly useless on wristwatches. 

When you first see this watch, you realize the Tourbillon is purely there for aesthetics. Somewhat reminiscent of the Omega La Magique, the 43mm rose and white gold case features the Tourbillon in the center of the sun-brushed dial. Every part of this opulent piece is handmade by a select group of horologists at Omega’s Atelier Tourbillon. 

Across the Tourbillon sits a titanium bridge from which the seconds hand runs, forged from rose gold; something you won’t see often and sets the watch apart from the other Tourbillon options on the market. Turning the case reveals the expertly finished Co-Axial Master Chronometer caliber 2640 finished in pure 18K rose gold. 

Conclusion

If you’re looking for a timepiece that breaks away from the onslaught of sports models we’ve seen over the past 20 years, you’ve got plenty of options now. Omega has a rich history of creating some of the most desirable and iconic dress-orientated models, and there’s a version for each of us. If not, simply buy a vintage pie pan Constellation; nothing beats a vintage gold Omega.